Diabetes and Diabetic Footcare

In an effort to be the most comprehensive (or at least one of the most comprehensive) blog(s) online, we scoured the internet and came across an interesting site with some great information regarding diabetes and arthritic related foot problems. The site Podiatry Channel has a great overview of diabetes in general as well as some tips for diabetic footwear. If you suffer from diabetes, one of the many things you can do to protect your feet is schedule regular check-ups with your doctor to make sure and catch any immediate problems before they get too serious. Also, be sure to scrub and clean your feet thoroughly on a daily basis. Cleanliness is a must.

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Foot Care for Diabetics

Diabetics may be more prone to foot problems due to the diabetic nerve damage in the lower limbs, but that doesn’t mean that diabetics will definitely have foot problems. Here are some helpful tips to keep your diabetic feet healthy:

  • Wash your feet every day. Dry them carefully, especially between the toes
  • Take the time to carefully trim your toenails on a regular basis
  • Keep your skin soft and smooth. Rub a thin coat of skin lotion over the tops and bottoms of your feet, but not between your toes
  • Be conscious about your feet and report any sores, discomfort, or infections to your doctor
  • Protect your feet from hot and cold. Wear diabetic shoes at the beach or on hot pavement. Don’t put your feet into hot water. Test water before putting your feet in it just as you would before bathing a baby. Never use hot water bottles, heating pads, or electric blankets. You can burn your feet without realizing it
  • Wear proper fitting diabetic shoes
  • Wear proper fitting diabetic socks
  • Be more active. Plan your physical activity program with your health team
  • Take care of your diabetes. Work with your health care team to keep your blood glucose in your target range
  • Begin taking good care of your feet today. Set a time every day to check your feet and get the process started now

Your healthcare provider is the best source of information for questions and concerns related to your diabetes and foot care. Your doctor or nurse should check your feet periodically when you go in for a visit. If you are having any problems, such as loss of feeling, sores or ingrown toenails, tell your healthcare physician right away. If little sores aren’t taken care of, they can get worse and turn into ulcers (serious, deep sores). If these ulcers become infected, you may have to go to the hospital or, in very serious cases, have a foot amputated (removed). Take these small steps and begin to increase your quality of life today!